Steps to Recover Deleted Photos from Nikon Camera

Pritam Majumdar    Pritam Majumdar     Updated On - 20 May 2019

Cameras are numerous, but very few of them can do what a Nikon DSLR camera can do. When you have a Nikon Digital SLR camera with you, you have your chance to take your photography to a whole new level. You wouldn’t need to lose a captured photo with your Nikon DSLR. However, like all mechanical instruments, you can always accidentally lose them. In that case, you should know how to recover the Nikon DSLR deleted photos, both JPEG and NEF formats. Some of the valuable reasons which set these cameras apart from many others are as follows:

  1. The more popular products under the Nikon Digital SLR: DSLR D4, DSLR D5, DSLR D90, DSLR D600, DSLR D800, DSLR D850 DSLR D3100, DSLR D3200, DSLR D3400, DSLR D3500, DSLR D5100, DSLR D5200, DSLR D5600, DSLR D7000, etc.
  2. Nikon Digital SLR cameras can record the pictures in the file formats:
    • NEF (RAW)
    • JPEG
    • NEF (RAW) + JPEG
  3. The camera’s storage media are those memory cards which are SD and UHS-I compliant SDHC and SDXC.
  4. NEF is a RAW format which has been exclusively created for the Nikon DSLR cameras. So, you may require a converter solution to preview your NEF RAW image on the Windows computer.

There are different reasons why these photos are deleted. The reasons for their deletion are as follows:

  • You have deleted those photos or the particular formats from the camera’s SD card.
  • If the SD card might get corrupted or gets infected through a virus attack, and you might lose stored photos.
  • While transferring photos from the Nikon camera to your Windows computer, an interruption might cause the picture to be lost.
  • All cameras seem to have a “Format Card” option. In case this option is used accidentally or even by mistake there are chances you might lose your photos from Nikon SD Card.

If you already have lost your pictures, you will need to recover them via third-party software on Windows PC such as Kernel Photo Recovery software.

Please note that you should avoid writing the SD card until you have performed a lost Nikon photo recovery from your SD card.

Here, are the Steps to Recover Deleted Photos from Nikon Camera using Kernel Photo Recovery:

  1. Open the Kernel Photo Recovery software. Select the drive from the ‘Select Drive to recover’ section. After doing that, press the Next button.
  2. Now, select the files extension for the recovery that you desire, and now you will need to click on Next.

  3. Note: Please note: you can easily edit the file size as per requirement. The tool is automatically bent on recovering images of size up to 20480kb; you will need to set the size capacity according to the requirements from ‘Settings.’

  4. As the drive has finished the scanning process, you are now capable of previewing the files by selecting a file type from the left pane.

    Please keep in mind: When you double-click on a photo, you can view a more detailed preview of those files that you have recovered.
  5. Now, select the specific photos you wish to recover and then click on Save. You can now save all your images by the clicking the Save All option.) Having done the above, you have the following window. Select the required destination.
  6. Click Ok. And then you have recovered those photos.

Conclusion

Pictures say a lot because they eternally preserve memories, whether marriages, birthdays, or anniversaries. No one wants to lose memories because memories make us who we are. This exquisitely true if we take these pictures via Nikon camera because of their impeccability. However, so many times we lose these pictures either due to our tomfoolery or due to some accident. That is precisely why you need to find out Steps to Recover Deleted Photos from Nikon Camera. And that is where Kernel Photo recovery software comes in handy. With the help of this software even you can recover deleted photos from SD card, USB, Pen-drive, CD, etc. If you are not convinced about buying, why don’t you try out the trial version of the software?